Showing posts with label Disaster. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Disaster. Show all posts

December 29, 2017

As climate change alters agriculture, forest food could be the answer. Odisha's indigenous Kondhs prove it

India's indigenous Kondh community has relied on forest food for millennia. As climate change reduces agricultural yields, this source of nutrition could be crucial for food security. 


As agriculture and climate change are victims and causes of each other, with effects such as drought affecting land productivity, reaching the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals which include achieving global food security and ending hunger by 2030 has become even more challenging.

In view of this, forests can play a crucial role as the basis of a sustainable food system – as has been the norm in the Kondh community, an indigenous group spread across the forests and hilly regions of the south of India’s Odisha state, for millennia.

March 02, 2016

Odisha Farmers Struggle for Survival

The state and central governments are likely to increase the focus on agriculture in their budgets. But the question remains: when will farmers receive the benefits of all these plans and programmes, and more importantly, how will they overcome the present crisis?

March 06, 2015

India’s climate change dilemma

Source: Global Times
From coastal to tropical and sub-tropical regions, farmers and forest dwellers across the eastern Indian state of Odisha encounter livelihood issues as climate change has severely impacted agriculture and forced people to migrate.

October 17, 2014

Disaster risk management is not just evacuation

On Sunday, October 12, 2014, the very severe cyclonic storm Hudhud mauled the coastal city of Visakhapatnam and adjacent districts in India’s southern state of Andhra Pradesh. But the storm couldn’t gather further strength or last longer because of the geographical gift in form of the hill range that cushioned the city where the storm made the landfall.

The southern part of Odisha was also partially affected by the storm but there was no large scale devastation one normally associates with such powerful storms.